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The School for Field Studies (SFS) - Cambodia: Conservation, Ethics, and Environmental Change
Siem Reap, Cambodia (Outgoing Program)
Program Terms:
Program Terms: Fall,
Spring
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Homepage: Click to visit
Program Sponsor: The School for Field Studies (SFS) 
Restrictions: F&M applicants only
Budget Sheets Fall,
Spring
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Dates / Deadlines:
Tabular data for Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Spring 2020 10/01/2019 ** Rolling Admission TBA TBA

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Applicants will be immediately notified of F&M approval for this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.
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Fact Sheet:
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Language of Instruction: English Minimum GPA: 2.8
Housing Options: Other Term: Fall, Spring
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Partner Institution:
SFS Program Advisor: Claire Retterer
Area of Study: Anthropology, Biology, Economics, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, International Studies, Religious Studies, Sciences, Sociology Program Type: Field Study, Study Center
Program Description:
Program Description:

School for Field Studies: Conservation, Ethics, and Environmental Change



OVERVIEW

In Cambodia, conservation has found its roots in community. From the ancient temples of Angkor to the floating villages of the great Tonle Sap Lake, efforts to preserve biodiversity are deeply intertwined with community livelihoods. Spend your semester in this fascinating country, learning about threats to ecosystems and natural resources, environmental governance, and the ethics of conservation and development. Traveling extensively, you will spend time in the elephant-inhabited forests of Mondulkiri, the mountains and mangrove forests of Kampot, the Mekong Delta, and at key conservation sites along the Mekong River. In the final weeks of the semester, you’ll spend your time out in the field conducting an extensive research project.
  • Spend the night in a floating village on the Tonle Sap Lake and speak with villagers about climate-related livelihood challenges and adaptation strategies
  • Visit the Mondulkiri highlands to study elephant conservation and learn about the changes and challenges to the traditional lifestyles of the Indigenous Bunong people
  • Observe populations of some of Cambodia’s most striking and endangered species: Cantor’s giant softshell turtle, Irrawaddy river dolphin, gibbon, giant ibis, and many more – both in the wild and in protected sanctuaries

WHAT YOU'LL STUDY

This academically rigorous program follows a six-day/week schedule. The interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to help students actively discover and understand the complexities of environmental, social, and economic issues in Cambodia. You will visit different ecosystems and communities, which may include a forested elephant sanctuary, the ancient temple complex of Angkor, protected community forests, coastal ecosystems, freshwater ecosystems on the Tonle Sap Lake, fishing villages, mangrove forests, mountains, farms, urban centers, and the elaborate canals and bustling floating markets of the Mekong Delta.
Major academic themes include:
  • Climate change impacts on the Tonlé Sap Lake
  • Elephant ecology and conservation
  • Traditional ecological and medicinal knowledge
  • Community conservation strategies
  • Environmental ethics and justice
  • Natural resource governance

WHAT YOU'LL PRACTICE

  • Research design and presentation
  • Species identification techniques
  • Biodiversity assessment methods
  • Interviewing and qualitative research methods
  • Statistical analysis and scientific writing
  • Language (Khmer)

RESEARCH

When you study abroad with SFS, you’re contributing to a legacy of environmental research and stewardship. Communities and ecosystems across the globe are dealing with the impacts of climate change, pollution, deforestation, and many other environmental threats. For more than 35 years, our students and faculty have been working to address these issues through focused research efforts.

With ten Centers around the world, our research covers a spectrum of important environmental issues. SFS programs provide the foundation for students to critically examine today’s environmental issues in an international setting and conduct meaningful, hands-on research in the field. You’ll be working alongside members of our faculty who have expertise in many fields including conservation ecology, environmental policy and ethics, and natural resource management, and the data you collect contributes valuable information to the global body of scientific knowledge.

Our planet is home to an incredible diversity of life, and its future depends on good science and informed policy. Through your research at SFS, you’re becoming part of a greater movement to protect the planet for generations to come. 


Franklin & Marshall Academic Policy
F&M requires all students to enroll in a full course load at the host institution or off-campus study program. You can typically find this information on the program partner's website. In many cases, this will be four or five courses for a semester. Many programs grant course credit in U.S. semester credit hours. Franklin & Marshall will award four F&M course credits for a total of 15 or 16 U.S. semester credit hours.  If the total number of credits for your program is more than 16 or less than 15, divide the total number by four to find out how many course credits you will receive (this includes summer study).

Courses on off-campus study programs must be taken for a letter grade, not on a pass/no pass basis. Grades from off-campus study program courses will appear on your Franklin & Marshall transcript, but they will not be calculated into your cumulative GPA.

Courses taken off-campus may be able to satisfy major, minor, language or distribution requirements (Arts, Humanities, Social Science, Non-Western Cultures or Natural Science Lab) in addition to general elective credit. Courses may fulfill more than one requirement. Please note that Franklin & Marshall cannot issue transfer credit for a course taken in a department that is not represented at the College.  If a course does not clearly fall under a department, the off-campus study advising staff can help you determine whether or not it can be accepted for credit.

Franklin & Marshall Housing Policy
Housing options during your off-campus study program will vary by program. Some programs may allow students to choose their housing option; other programs require all students to live in a certain type of housing. Typical housing arrangements may include apartments, homestays, or on-campus housing at a local university. Please visit the program homepage to determine your program's housing options or requirements.

Please note that some programs may offer students the option to pursue independent housing (outside of the regular housing options provided by the program). F&M does not allow students to choose independent housing unless there is a significant academic or cultural reason (such as wanting to live in a homestay when only apartment housing is provided). Independent housing carries many risks and F&M and the program provider cannot provide any support to students who pursue independent housing. Students who are interested in pursuing independent housing will need to contact their off-campus study adviser to petition for approval to pursue this option.

Financial Policy, Financial Aid and Scholarships
During the academic year, students will continue to be eligible for financial aid during a term of off-campus study.   This includes federal and state loans and Franklin & Marshall merit scholarships and need-based grants.  In general, eligibility for financial aid is based on Franklin & Marshall tuition, cost of housing and meals from the off-campus study program, and an allowance for books and personal expenses.  Your annual estimated family contribution as generated by your FAFSA will remain the same regardless of program costs. Students who receive Grant-in-Aid benefits will continue to access these benefits for the semester off-campus. This benefit is only available to students of eligible full-time F&M faculty and staff.

Students may be eligible for additional scholarships outside of F&M, please review the Scholarships section of the website for more information.



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