Skip to content
Programs : Brochure
This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
SIT Australia: Sustainability and Environmental Action
Byron Bay, Australia (Outgoing Program)
Program Terms:
Program Terms: Fall,
Spring
Layout wrapper table for buttons
Layout table containing buttons
Request Advising
Layout table containing buttons
Homepage: Click to visit
Program Sponsor: SIT/World Learning 
Restrictions: F&M applicants only
Budget Sheets Fall,
Spring
Dates / Deadlines: - unrelated header
Dates / Deadlines:
Tabular data for Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Spring 2020 10/01/2019 ** Rolling Admission TBA TBA

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Applicants will be immediately notified of F&M approval for this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.
Fact Sheet: - unrelated header
Fact Sheet:
#i18n(14)# parameter/value output
Language of Instruction: English Minimum GPA: 2.5
Housing Options: Homestay, Other Term: Fall, Spring
Glossary entry for program parameter 10258
Partner Institution:
SIT Program Advisor: Dean Ali Janicek
Area of Study: Biology, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Government, Sciences, Sociology Program Type: Field Study, Study Center
Program Description:
Program Description:

SIT Study Abroad Australia: Sustainability and Environmental Action

Investigate alternatives to current systems that are degrading the environment and increasing inequality, and be inspired by the incredible beauty of Australia’s World Heritage areas.

Program Highlights 

  • Live two blocks from the beach in the small coastal town of Byron Bay.
  • Go on a four-day camping trip with Aboriginal elders.
  • Learn about ecopsychology, environmental action, and sustainable futures during interactive, multi-day workshops.
  • Explore the methods of environmental activism.
  • Discover how Australia’s successful sustainability efforts can be applied at home.
  • Spend eight days in Tasmania, exploring its ancient forests and learning about conservation.
  • Do independent field research or an internship.

Key Topics of Study

  • Sustainability
  • Sense of place
  • The natural environment and nature conservation
  • Social change and environmental action
  • Ecopsychology and environmental ethics
  • Aboriginal relationships with the environment
Please visit the SIT Study Abroad website for details on program courses (including syllabi), educational excursions, and housing.

Internships 

This program offers a five-week internship with an environmental nonprofit organization or a government department or agency focused on environmental issues. An internship with a for-profit entity is also possible but only if the entity is primarily focused on environmental outcomes. The internship will enable you to gain valuable work experience in the field of sustainability and enhance your skills in an international work environment. A minimum of 150 hours must be spent working for the organization.
SIT internships are hands on and reflective. In addition to completing the internship, you will submit a paper processing your learning experience on the job and analyzing an issue important to the organization you worked with, and/or you will design a socially responsible solution to a problem identified by the organization.

Sample internships:  
  • Researching and writing materials for a social media outreach campaign with 1 Million Women
  • Campaigning with The Wilderness Society for a new national park in Victoria
  • Developing a children’s space within the Mullumbimby Community Garden
  • Taking photographs and developing promotional materials for the Melbourne Farmers’ Market
  • Collating and analyzing information from a renewable energy forum at the New South Wales Office of Environment and Heritage
  • Assessing demand for local foods at Armidale City Council
  • Working on a campaign to preserve the Great Eastern Ranges with Australian Conservation Foundation
  • Developing a travel plan for a large hospital with Victoria’s Health Department
  • Assessing the effectiveness of sustainability initiatives targeting small businesses at Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment 
  • Campaigning against the expansion of salmon farming with Environment Tasmania
  • Helping Ocean Planet with marine conservation campaigns in Tasmania

Program Structure

There is no "typical day" on an SIT program. Activities may take place on any day of the week and at any time of day to be in accordance with according to local norms and to take advantage of once-in-a-lifetime learning opportunities. Thus, the schedule and structure of the program are likely very different from what students are used to on their home campuses. The semester progresses in phases:
  • The program begins with a thorough orientation.
  • During the first two and a half months of the program, students are engaged in foundational coursework, including:
  • thematic seminars, including education excursions,
  • language instruction focused on improving practical communication skills, and
  • a field research methods and ethics course that prepares students to conduct independent research.
  • For the last month of the program, students conduct an Independent Study Project (ISP) on an approved topic of their choosing. 
  • Finally, students present their project, participate in program evaluations, and prepare to return home.

What Makes SIT Unique

  • SIT Study Abroad offers a field-based, experiential approach to learning.
  • Each program has a small group of students (typically 10–35). 
  • On an SIT program, students gain high levels of access to many different stakeholders and experts relevant to the issues the program is examining. 
  • While some learning will be conducted at the SIT program center, extensive learning is done outside the classroom — in host communities, field stations, NGO headquarters, ecological sites, health clinics, and art studios.
  • Many students go on to use their Independent Study Projects as a basis for senior theses on their home campuses. Others use their undergraduate research and overall study abroad experience to successfully apply for fellowships such as Fulbrights and Watsons. 



Franklin & Marshall Academic Policy
F&M requires all students to enroll in a full course load at the host institution or off-campus study program. You can typically find this information on the program partner's website. In many cases, this will be four or five courses for a semester. Many programs grant course credit in U.S. semester credit hours. Franklin & Marshall will award four F&M course credits for a total of 15 or 16 U.S. semester credit hours.  If the total number of credits for your program is more than 16 or less than 15, divide the total number by four to find out how many course credits you will receive (this includes summer study).

Courses on off-campus study programs must be taken for a letter grade, not on a pass/no pass basis. Grades from off-campus study program courses will appear on your Franklin & Marshall transcript, but they will not be calculated into your cumulative GPA.

Courses taken off-campus may be able to satisfy major, minor, language or distribution requirements (Arts, Humanities, Social Science, Non-Western Cultures or Natural Science Lab) in addition to general elective credit. Courses may fulfill more than one requirement. Please note that Franklin & Marshall cannot issue transfer credit for a course taken in a department that is not represented at the College.  If a course does not clearly fall under a department, the off-campus study advising staff can help you determine whether or not it can be accepted for credit.

Franklin & Marshall Housing Policy
Housing options during your off-campus study program will vary by program. Some programs may allow students to choose their housing option; other programs require all students to live in a certain type of housing. Typical housing arrangements may include apartments, homestays, or on-campus housing at a local university. Please visit the program homepage to determine your program's housing options or requirements.

Please note that some programs may offer students the option to pursue independent housing (outside of the regular housing options provided by the program). F&M does not allow students to choose independent housing unless there is a significant academic or cultural reason (such as wanting to live in a homestay when only apartment housing is provided). Independent housing carries many risks and F&M and the program provider cannot provide any support to students who pursue independent housing. Students who are interested in pursuing independent housing will need to contact their off-campus study adviser to petition for approval to pursue this option.

Financial Policy, Financial Aid and Scholarships
During the academic year, students will continue to be eligible for financial aid during a term of off-campus study.   This includes federal and state loans and Franklin & Marshall merit scholarships and need-based grants.  In general, eligibility for financial aid is based on Franklin & Marshall tuition, cost of housing and meals from the off-campus study program, and an allowance for books and personal expenses.  Your annual estimated family contribution as generated by your FAFSA will remain the same regardless of program costs. Students who receive Grant-in-Aid benefits will continue to access these benefits for the semester off-campus. This benefit is only available to students of eligible full-time F&M faculty and staff.

Students may be eligible for additional scholarships outside of F&M, please review the Scholarships section of the website for more information.



Layout wrapper table for buttons
Layout table containing buttons