Skip to content
Programs : Brochure
This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
IFE Brussels Field Study & Internship
Brussels, Belgium (Outgoing Program)
Program Terms:
Program Terms: Fall,
Spring
Layout wrapper table for buttons
Layout table containing buttons
Request Advising
Homepage: Click to visit
Restrictions: F&M applicants only
Budget Sheets Fall,
Spring
Fact Sheet: - unrelated header
Fact Sheet:
#i18n(14)# parameter/value output
Language of Instruction: French Minimum GPA: 3.0
Housing Options: Homestay, Residence Halls Term: Fall, Spring
Glossary entry for program parameter 10258
Partner Institution:
IFE Language Pre-Requisite: 4 semesters
Program Advisor: Dean Sue Mennicke Program Type: Internship Opportunities, Study Center
Program Description:
Program Description:

IFE Field Study in Brussels

IFE serves as a resource for advancing transatlantic understanding and contributing to European Studies in the US, principally by exposing students in depth and in situ to contemporary European society. At IFE international education is driven by a vision focusing on rigor in academics, seriousness of purpose in experiential education, high standards for cross-cultural exposure and learning and, finally, the importance and value of integrating these three goals.


Program Overview

Brussels is a Hieronymus Bosch triptych of all that is happening at a European level: the myriad of initiatives, activist movements and soft lobbying campaigns in all areas on all issues whether cultural, social or political, carried out by European citizens. The Brussels Field Study and Internship program takes place in both the fall and spring, over the course of an 18 week semester. The semester begins with 5 weeks of intensive interdisciplinary courses, followed by a 12-week full time internship in the student’s field. As part of the internship, students conduct field research, delving into an issue and producing a 30-page independent study.


Academics

To enable students to take the step across the line that separates observers from participants, the IFE model begins with five weeks of classroom training, a mix of lectures and workshops combined with site visits. The IFE preparatory sessions provide students with an in-depth introduction to the local setting and culture that will be their milieu for living, working and studying during eighteen weeks. All instruction is solely in French.

Three courses comprise the Preparatory Session (+ conversational Dutch): Belgium: A European Cultural History, Brussels in Belgium and in Europe: A socio-urbanist approach, and Belgium in Europe and the World: A historical approach
Internship Period: Students work individually with their research advisor to delineate a research topic, set an outline, define sources, and produce the independent study field research project.
Student-interns also return weekly to IFE premises to attend a fourth academic course (What is Europe? Culture, Institutions, Society(ies)).


Field Research
Students work individually with a research advisor from their field. The first task is to identify a topic, following guidelines established by IFE for research topic choice. The subject must be tied in a useful and complementary way to the student-intern’s responsibilities, as well as to the core concerns of the host organization. The research question should be designed to draw as much as possible on resources available to the intern via the internship (data, documents, interviews, observations, seminars and the like). The extensive independent study field research paper produced by the student is both the centerpiece of the intern’s professional engagement and the culmination of the academic achievements of the semester.

Housing
There is no housing plan integral to the IFE program. IFE will, however:
  • Arrange family housing for students who wish that type of housing, within the limits of available situations
  • Arrange housing in one of several independent student residences or foyers on behalf of students


Franklin & Marshall Academic Policy
F&M requires all students to enroll in a full course load at the host institution or off-campus study program. You can typically find this information on the program partner's website. In many cases, this will be four or five courses for a semester. Many programs grant course credit in U.S. semester credit hours. Franklin & Marshall will award four F&M course credits for a total of 15 or 16 U.S. semester credit hours.  If the total number of credits for your program is more than 16 or less than 15, divide the total number by four to find out how many course credits you will receive.

Courses on off-campus study programs must be taken for a letter grade, not on a pass/no pass basis. Grades from off-campus study program courses will appear on your Franklin & Marshall transcript, but they will not be calculated into your cumulative GPA. 

Courses taken off-campus may be able to satisfy major, minor, language or distribution requirements (Arts, Humanities, Social Science, Non-Western Cultures or Natural Science Lab) in addition to general elective credit. Courses may fulfill more than one requirement. Please note that Franklin & Marshall cannot issue transfer credit for a course taken in a department that is not represented at the college.  If a course does not clearly fall under a department, the off-campus study advising staff can help you determine whether or not it can be accepted for credit.

Franklin & Marshall Housing Policy
Housing options during your off-campus study program will vary by program. Some programs may allow students to choose their housing option; other programs require all students to live in a certain type of housing. Typical housing arrangements may include apartments, home-stay, or on-campus housing at a local university. Please visit the program homepage to determine your program's housing options or requirements.

Please note that some programs may offer students the option to pursue independent housing (outside of the regular housing options provided by the program). F&M does not allow students to choose independent housing unless there is a significant academic or cultural reason (such as wanting to live in a homestay when only apartment housing is provided). Independent housing carries many risks and F&M and the program provider cannot provide any support to students who pursue independent housing. Students who are interested in pursuing independent housing will need to contact their off-campus study adviser to petition for approval to pursue this option.

Financial Policy, Financial Aid and Scholarships
During the academic year, students will continue to be eligible for financial aid during a term of off-campus study.   This includes federal and state loans and Franklin & Marshall merit scholarships and need-based grants.  In general, eligibility for financial aid is based on Franklin & Marshall tuition, cost of housing and meals from the off-campus study program, and an allowance for books and personal expenses.  Your annual estimated family contribution as generated by your FAFSA will remain the same regardless of program costs. Students who receive Grant-in-Aid benefits will continue to access these benefits for the semester off-campus. This benefit is only available to students of eligible full-time F&M faculty and staff.

Students may be eligible for additional scholarships outside of F&M, please review the Scholarships section of the website for more information.


Layout wrapper table for buttons
Layout table containing buttons