Skip to content
Programs : Brochure
This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
Duke ICCS - Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies
Rome, Italy (Outgoing Program)
Program Terms:
Program Terms: Fall,
Spring
Layout wrapper table for buttons
Layout table containing buttons
Request Advising
Layout table containing buttons
Homepage: Click to visit
Restrictions: F&M applicants only
Budget Sheets Fall,
Spring
Dates / Deadlines: - unrelated header
Dates / Deadlines:
Tabular data for Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Spring 2020 10/01/2019 ** Rolling Admission TBA TBA
Fall 2020 03/01/2020 ** Rolling Admission TBA TBA
Spring 2021 10/01/2020 12/01/2020 TBA TBA

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Applicants will be immediately notified of F&M approval for this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.
Fact Sheet: - unrelated header
Fact Sheet:
#i18n(14)# parameter/value output
Language of Instruction: English Minimum GPA: 3.0
Housing Options: Dorm Term: Fall, Spring
Glossary entry for program parameter 10258
Partner Institution:
Duke University Program Advisor: Claire Retterer
Area of Study: Archaeology, Art and Art History, Classics, Greek, Italian, Latin Program Type: Study Center
Program Description:
Program Description:

ICCS Rome: Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome

Program Overview

The premier North American Center for the study of the Classical World in Italy, the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (ICCS) was established in 1965 by representatives of ten American colleges and universities. The number of member institutions has now grown to over 100. It provides undergraduate students with an opportunity in Rome to study ancient history, archaeology, Greek and Latin literature, Italian language, and ancient art. ICCS has received generous aid from the Danforth Foundation, The Old Dominion Foundation, The Mellon Foundation, and the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, as well as the continuing support of a consortium of colleges and universities and contributions from former students.

Academics

The curriculum is structured differently from that in many American colleges and universities. Students are expected to take four courses, which is a minimum and normal load; a few students take five courses. Students are required to take at least one course in Latin or Greek as part of their ICCS course load.

A major part of the academic work is a required comprehensive and integrated two-credit course called The Ancient City. It is a two-credit course which requires as much class and study time as two semester courses. It covers Roman archaeology and topography, aspects of social and urban history of Rome, and Roman civilization. Frequent site visits and explorations, intensive museum tours and lectures, and wider-ranging trips based on the Professor-in-Charge's area's of expertise outside Rome are included as part of the course. In the recent past, Campania and Sicily have been the focus of extended and focused study. Because The Ancient City course depends on prior knowledge of Roman history, students are expected to prepare themselves by taking a Roman history course or by careful reading on the subject.

The Center

Located in a four-story building on one of the main streets of the Janiculum, the Center is ten minutes by bus from the Piazza Venezia and downtown Rome. It is close to the American Academy in Rome with which it maintains cordial relations. The building is owned by an order of nuns, the Suore Infermiere dell'Addolorata, and contains student bedrooms, classrooms, a library, offices, dining rooms, and a kitchen. Outside is a small and pleasant garden. The neighborhood is residential with apartment buildings, small shops, cafes, and services. Three meals a day are provided at the Center, Monday through Friday. Other meals are at individual student's expense and are not included in the program fees.

Students will be assigned rooms at the Center (mostly doubles). The Center can accommodate 36 students. Because the Center is small, and all students are together for meals and at least the Ancient City course, the living situation can be very intense and generally requires adjustment on everyone's part. Students are urged to have a positive outlook and to spend available time outside of the Center.

Eligibility

Applicants must be currently registered undergraduates majoring in classics or classical history/civilization, or in archaeology or art history with strong classical interests and background. All applicants should have at least a B average. A background in Roman History is strongly advised. Preference will be given to those students who are prepared to take courses in Latin and/or ancient Greek at the intermediate level or higher.  Selection is made on the basis of a transcript, a completed online application, ICCS online questionnaire, a statement of purpose, and two letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the ICCS Representative at the applicant's home institution. Except for the transcript, all of these items should be submitted through the online application system.

The program is strenuous. There is extensive walking and some climbing. Our experience has been that participants must be in good physical condition to be able to participate successfully. Therefore, we ask that you consider your general health, physical abilities, and stamina (including problems with diet and medication) before applying to this program.



Franklin & Marshall Academic Policy
F&M requires all students to enroll in a full course load at the host institution or off-campus study program. You can typically find this information on the program partner's website. In many cases, this will be four or five courses for a semester. Many programs grant course credit in U.S. semester credit hours. Franklin & Marshall will award four F&M course credits for a total of 15 or 16 U.S. semester credit hours.  If the total number of credits for your program is more than 16 or less than 15, divide the total number by four to find out how many course credits you will receive.

Courses on off-campus study programs must be taken for a letter grade, not on a pass/no pass basis. Grades from off-campus study program courses will appear on your Franklin & Marshall transcript, but they will not be calculated into your cumulative GPA. 

Courses taken off-campus may be able to satisfy major, minor, language or distribution requirements (Arts, Humanities, Social Science, Non-Western Cultures or Natural Science Lab) in addition to general elective credit. Courses may fulfill more than one requirement. Please note that Franklin & Marshall cannot issue transfer credit for a course taken in a department that is not represented at the college.  If a course does not clearly fall under a department, the off-campus study advising staff can help you determine whether or not it can be accepted for credit.


Franklin & Marshall Housing Policy
Housing options during your off-campus study program will vary by program. Some programs may allow students to choose their housing option; other programs require all students to live in a certain type of housing. Typical housing arrangements may include apartments, home-stay, or on-campus housing at a local university. Please visit the program homepage to determine your program's housing options or requirements.

Please note that some programs may offer students the option to pursue independent housing (outside of the regular housing options provided by the program). F&M does not allow students to choose independent housing unless there is a significant academic or cultural reason (such as wanting to live in a homestay when only apartment housing is provided). Independent housing carries many risks and F&M and the program provider cannot provide any support to students who pursue independent housing. Students who are interested in pursuing independent housing will need to contact their off-campus study adviser to petition for approval to pursue this option.

Financial Aid and Scholarships
During the academic year, students will continue to be eligible for financial aid during a term of off-campus study.   This includes federal and state loans and Franklin & Marshall merit scholarships and need-based grants.  In general, eligibility for financial aid is based on Franklin & Marshall tuition, cost of housing and meals from the off-campus study program, and an allowance for books and personal expenses.  Your annual estimated family contribution as generated by your FAFSA will remain the same regardless of program costs. Students who receive Grant-in-Aid benefits will continue to access these benefits for the semester off-campus. This benefit is only available to students of eligible full-time F&M faculty and staff.

Students may be eligible for additional scholarships outside of F&M, please review the Scholarships section of the website for more information.


Layout wrapper table for buttons
Layout table containing buttons